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DB-5 How to Transport a Double Bass

Here is what I’ve learned so far about how to safely transport my double bass.


 Watch The Video Lesson



About Transporting the Bass

This is lesson DB-5, “How to Transport a Double Bass” and is a continuation of  my journal of things I have learned as a beginning adult double bass student.  Be sure to check out my Double Bass Lessons page for a complete list of all of my lessons!

Today, I am going to talk about things to consider when you are moving or transporting your bass.

Number 1.

Use a bass bag. The bag that I have, which you can see in the picture, came with the bass when I bought it and it provides a good level of protection, but the padding is not very thick. I am considering buying a higher quality bag when I have the money. So far, the Eastman Presto Soft Case, model CB60, shown in the next picture looks good. This bag comes with wheels! I have had a few gigs where it has been a long walk from the car to the building and being able to roll Bubba (my nickname for my bass) would take a load off. You can get the Presto bag from Linda West.com. Here is a link to the Linda West product page:  http://www.lindawest.com/product_p/cb60.htm

Number 2.

Get a stand. I have the Ingles Adjustable Cello and Bass Stand.  The bottom supports are height adjustable. It has a hook to hang your bow on the back of the stand and it has a latch to close to keep the neck of the bass from jumping out of the stand.

Number 3.

Protect the edges of the bass with edge protectors. This is one of the first things I added to my bass. They are leather and keep the wood of the edges on the bouts off the ground when you lay the bass down on its side. I got mine from Gollihur Music.

Number 4.

In a vehicle: Be careful! The bass is large and bulky and things can easily get damaged if you are not careful loading it in and out of your vehicle. It’s best to put the bass on its side, with the back against a wall. If possible secure it with something such as a bungee cord, or at least brace it with something that won’t shift so it doesn’t roll over when going around a corner. See the picture for an example of the bass secured in the bed of a pickup truck. I would not transport the bass in a truck without the covering of a canopy to keep out the elements, unless you are going a very short distance and you are sure it is not going to rain!

If you don’t have a minivan, SUV or truck, watch the video for a demonstration of how to get a double bass into a small car!  In this video I show you that it is possible to get a 3/4 size double bass into and out of a 4 door, mid-size sedan.  Ideally, you will have something with more room such as a mini-van, an SUV or a truck.  But, in a pinch this can be done!

Caution: If you have no choice but to lay the bass on its back, put something such as a folded blanket or a pillow under the shoulders to lift the scroll up off the floor to ensure no pressure is placed on the neck.

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